Driverless Trucks: A Labor Force Threat or an Invaluable Industry Opportunity?

Posted by PLS Logistics April 13, 2017 at 1:01 PM

Trucking has provided drivers and families with a decent living for decades. Although the demand for truckers has been persistent, most don’t expect it to last forever, especially since major truck manufacturers and startups have been busy testing automated and driverless trucks.

Read More

6 Transportation News Stories: August 2016

Posted by PLS Logistics August 31, 2016 at 8:00 AM

 

  • Louisiana Weather Causes Shipment Delays. Louisiana called a state of emergency after heavy rainfall affected the region. More than 280 state roads have been flooded and closed, affecting intermodal rail and truckload shipping. “It’s a major disaster,” said Rodney Mallett of Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. (Learn more here.)

  • Market Condition: Continued Price Declines. The most recent edition of the Truckload and Intermodal Cost Index reflects the ongoing stretch of rate declines for both modes. Truckload rates dropped 1.6% annually in July, marking the 5th straight month of annual declines. July’s intermodal rates were down 2.4% annually. (Read more here.)

  • GHG and Fuel Efficiency Rules Set. The EPA and DOT’s NHTSA finalized standards for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles that will improve fuel efficiency and cut carbon pollution. The final rules build on the fuel efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions standards already in place. (How Will Shippers Be Affected by Green Regulations?)

  • FAA Permits Test Delivery Drones in US. Alphabet, Google’s parent company, will be flying drones in designated areas to gather data to develop an airspace management system. Google is pressing for product delivery-by-drone within the next 3 years. (When Will Your Products Be Delivered by Drones?)

Read More

Market Update: 9 Factors Determining the Rise in Transportation Rates

Posted by PLS Logistics August 17, 2016 at 11:30 AM

Freight shippers are enjoying a buyer’s market at the moment. There’s widespread overcapacity in the trucking industry, forcing carriers to lower prices in an attempt to keep their trucks full. For now, shippers can find low transportation rates relatively easily.

As with any cyclical industry, this will all change. Soon, carriers will be dictating rates and shippers will be competing for trailer space, paying much more for transportation than they are right now.

Why is this happening? And when can shippers expect to pay higher rates?

There are 9 major factors that will determine the severity and timing of the rate hikes.

Operating Costs

  1. When energy prices rebound, it will increase operating costs for trucking companies. In response, they will have to increase fuel surcharges to cover their expenses. Carriers make more profit from fuel surcharges when fuel costs are high, so the surcharge increase won’t be proportional.

Read More

Panama Canal Expansion: Everything You Need to Know

Posted by PLS Logistics July 7, 2016 at 10:30 AM

History of the Panama Canal

During the 1800s, businessmen didn’t have an efficient or quick way to ship goods between the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. The British proposed a canal through Nicaragua that was never built and the French attempted to build a canal through Panama but evacuated the project due to fatal diseases. Despite the unsuccessful attempts, Americans were undeterred. In 1914, the United States began to build a canal in Panama. 

In 2006, the Panamanian government authorized the first major expansion of the Panama Canal since it opened in 1917. The expansion is set to be complete in 2016. (As of April 2016, the project was 98% completed). The expansion is expected to double the capacity of the canal.

The Panama Canal is an important link to global trade, accepting an estimated 5% of the world’s total cargo volume. It takes a ship about 8-10 hours to make its way through the canal. The canal serves over 140 maritime trade routes to over 80 countries. American ships use the canal the most, followed by China, Chile, Japan, Columbia and South Korea. Every vessel must pay a toll based on its size and cargo volume. Tolls for the largest ships can run as high as $450,000.

Read More
Camcode Top Logistics Blog

Follow Us

Posts by Topic

See All